Barlow Road banner
    HOME     NorthwestJourney.com     ColumbiaRiverImages.com
"The Barlow Road"
Includes ... Barlow Road ... Barlow Trail ... "Mount Hood Road" ... Territorial Stage Road ... Mount Hood Loop Road ... U.S. Highway 26 ... The Dalles, Oregon ... Mount Hood ... Sandy, Oregon ... Oregon City ... Oregon Trail ... National Register of Historic Places ...
Image, 2013, Sign, Barlow Road, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Barlow Road sign, Foster Farm, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2013.


The Barlow Road ...
The Barlow Road --- "officially" the "Mount Hood Road" --- was a part of the Oregon Trail. The road was authorized by the Oregon Legislature in 1845, and by September 1846, it made its way around the south side of Mount Hood. This 80-to-110-mile road (it varied as the route changed over the years) provided an alternative to the dangerous and expensive route that used rafts to transport wagons down the Columbia River. During the Barlow Road's 70-plus-year history it passed through many ownerships and many improvements. In 1912, Henry Wemme of Portland became the last private owner of the Barlow Road. It was donated to the State of Oregon by his estate in 1919.

The Barlow Road began at The Dalles and headed south to Tygh Valley, which some folks consider the start of the Barlow Road. From Tygh Valley the trail turned west and followed the north bank of the White River before heading north and northwest through Barlow Pass and Government Camp. The road then generally followed the Sandy River to the community of Sandy, where the road turned west and ended up at Oregon City.



 
Barlow Road Information


Oregon Trail ...
The Oregon Trail ran approximately 2,000 miles from Missouri to the Rocky Mountains and then to the Willamette Valley of Oregon. The trip took four to six months. Independence, Missouri, is considered the beginning of the Oregon Trail and Oregon City, Oregon, is considered the end. The trail was busy, lasting from the early 1840s and ending with the coming of the railroad at the end of the 1860s. Large scale migration began in 1843, when a wagon train of over 800 people with 120 wagons and 5,000 cattle made the five month journey.

Image, 2013, Sandy, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Barlow Road Mural, "Peaceful Vistas", Sandy, Oregon. Mural depicts pioneer family on the Barlow Road, painted by Roger Cooke, 1993, located in Sandy, Oregon. Image taken June 28, 2013.


The beginning of the Barlow Road is ??? ...
Many folks say the Barlow Road started in The Dalles. However, by 1845 when Sam Barlow scouted the new road, a route already existed from The Dalles to Tygh Valley, making Tygh Valley to be considered by some to be the beginning of the Barlow Road. Other scholars consider the first tollgate site at Gate Creek, south and west of Tygh Valley, to be the starting point. The ending however has always been Oregon City, the "End of the Oregon Trail."

Image, 2013, Wamic, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Welcome to Wamic", Wamic, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2013.
Image, 2012, Sign, Barlow Road, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Barlow Road. At U.S. Forest Service Road #3530, at Barlow Pass. Image taken August 14, 2012.


Barlow Road History ...

"In the fall of 1845, the Samuel K. Barlow party from Independence, Mo. arrived at The Dalles. They found they would have to wait weeks for passage and could not afford the high price of food for themselves and their stock. Having seen a notch in the south slope of Mt. Hood, Barlow decided that"God never made a mountain that had no place to go over it or around it," and headed south to find a way around Mount Hood. He was joined by several other parties, namely those of Joel Palmer and William Rector, until over 30 wagons made up the first train determined to cross the Cascades before winter snows fell.  ...  

On October 11, Palmer, Barlow, and a man named Lock scouted ahead of the main party. They continued to the summit of the Cascades - later known as Barlow Pass, elevation 4,155 feet. Then they scouted the southern flanks of Mount Hood. Looming between them and the dreaded Columbia, the mountain stood snowy and immense. Palmer later recorded "I had never before looked upon a sight so nobly grand." But they could not linger. They crossed a wide, stony field, then sought a better view farther up the mountain. Finally, they came to a wide, steep-sided ravine, so deep the timber below resembled miniature Christmas trees. (They were probably looking across Zigzag Canyon.) Palmer's journal describes the spot: "A precipitate cliff of rocks, at the head, prevented passage around it. The hills were of the same material as that we had been travelling over, and were very steep." The men decided to climb higher up the mountain, hoping to see another path. Palmer, being the most hardy of the three, went on alone after snow was encountered. He probably ventured out onto Zigzag Glacier, climbing about one-third the distance from timberline to the summit, though his mocassins had worn thin and he traveled much of the distance barefoot. Meeting his companions again, they rejoined the road-building members of the party on Barlow Creek about 11 p.m. that night. After one more exploring trip, the group decided to build a cabin and store their belongings. They did not have time to build the road over the rough terrain between them and the Willamette Valley before the winter snows began. Two of the party started to Oregon City for fresh supplies. One man stayed behind at "Fort Deposit" as they called the cabin, as a guard. Then, in small groups, they made their way out of the mountains, some on foot, some on horseback. At least one woman rode a cow.   ...

After the snowsmelted the following year, the groups returned for their wagons. Barlow petitioned the Provisional Legislature for the right to construct a toll road over the route taken by the party. With a partner, Philip Foster, Barlow began road construction. It was a difficult road to build. There were miles of thickets and dense timber to slash through. Swamps had to be "courduroyed." There were steep hills and strems to cross. Barlow petitioned for $4000 to construct the road; he had estimated a rate of $50 a mile. But even in those days this was not an adequate amount and supplies had to be bought on credit. By August 1846 the road was was ready for travel."


Source:    Wasco History website, 2012, Barlow Trail, taken from the Mount Hood National Forest USDA Pamphlet #797-672/4.


Authorization of the Barlow Road ...

Mount Hood Road.
"AN ACT authorizing Samuel K. Barlow to lay out and construct a road across the Cascade mountains, and for other purposes.
Be it enacted by the House of Representatives of Oregon Territory, as follows:
Sec. 1.   That Samuel K. Barlow and his associates, their heirs and assigns, be, and they are hereby authorized to lay out and construct a wagon road from Oregon City, on the Willamette river, passing south of Mount Hood to the base of the Cascade mountains, on the east side of the same.
Sec. 2.   That Samuel K. Barlow and his associates, their heirs and assigns, be, and they are hereby authorizeed to construct a toll-gate on said road, at some suitable point, either on the summit or slope of the Cascade mountains.
Sec. 3.   That it shall be lawful for said Barlow and his associates, their heirs and assigns, to collect toll from all white persons, and descendants of the same, that may pass to or from the Willamette Valley, for the space of two years, commencing on the first day of January, A.D., 1846, and ending on the first day of January, A.D. 1848, at the following rates, to wit:
For each wagon ..... 5 dollars
For each head of horses, mules or asses, whether loose, geared, or saddled ... 10 cents.
For each head of horned cattle, whether geared or loose ... 10 cents.
Sec. 4   That the said Barlow and his associates, their heirs and assigns, shall open, or cause to be opened, a safe and sufficient wagon road from Oregon City to the base of the Cascade mountains, on the east side, on or before the first day of September, 1846, and keep the same in repair for the space of two years.
Sec. 5   That the said Samuel K. Barlow, for himself, his heirs and assigns, shall enter into bond to Oregon Territory, within twenty days of the passage of this act, to be approved by the governor, in the penal sum of two thousand dollars, conditioned for the faithful performance of all that is required of him to be performed in this act.
Sec. 6   That nothing in this act shall be so construed, to exempt persons from paying toll, who may employ Indians to drive their cattle, horses, &c., along said road.
H.A.G. LEE, Speaker pre tem.
Approved, Oregon City, Dec. 18, 1845,
GEO. ABERNETHY, Governor.
Attest: J.E. Long, Clerk


Source:    Oregon Spectator, August 6, 1846, Oregon City, Oregon Territory, No.14.


Image, 2013, Barlow Road sign at The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
The Dalles, Oregon ... Barlow Road route sign. Image taken April 3, 2013.
Image, 2012, Sandy, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Sandy, Oregon ... Barlow Road route sign at Pioneer Boulevard (Oregon Highway 26) and Ten Eyke Road. Today's Ten Eyke Road follows the old Barlow Road route to the "Lower Crossing" of the Sandy River and the location of the second Tollgate. Image taken July 13, 2012.


Tollgates ...
Five tollgates were established along the route of the Barlow Road between 1846 and 1918. Tolls ended when the estate of the final owner deeded the road to the State of Oregon. Jim Thompkins wrote in "Discovering Laurel Hill and the Barlow Road" (1996, 2002):   "The orignal toll gate at the Strickland Place on Gate Creek near Wamic on the eastern side was replaced by one at Francis Revenue's farm on the Sandy River in 1853. It was moved to the Summit House at Summit Meadows in 1866. It was then moved to Meeting Rock at Two-Mile Camp in 1871. In 1883 it was moved again, two miles down to the site just east of Rhododendron where a replica of that last toll gate is found today. Toll was collected until 1918."

  • 1846 to 1852:   The first tollgate of the Barlow Road operated from 1846 to 1852, and was located at the Strickland Place on Gate Creek near Wamic, Oregon, Tygh Valley.
  • 1853 to 1865:   The second tollgate was located at Francis Revenue's farm along the Sandy River, near today's community of Sandy. This tollgate was known as the "Lower Crossing".
  • 1866 to 1871:   The third tollgate established was located at today's Summit Meadows, at the location wagon trains would pause and rest, preparing for the descent down Laurel Hill. Toll was collected at the Perry Vickers house.
  • 1871 to 1883:   The fourth tollgate established was located west of Laurel Hill, where the wagon trains regrouped after coming down the trecherous hill. A log cabin called Mountain House was built there to accomodate the travelers. The site is where the Stagecoach Road rejoined the original Barlow Road, an area known as the "Meeting Rocks".
  • 1883 to 1918:   The fifth and last tollgate was established in 1883 and remained in operation until 1918. It was located near today's community of Rhododendron, located on Oregon Highway 26. Today there is a "Tollgate Replica" at the location.

Image, 2011, Barlow Road Tollgate Replica, Mount Hood, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Barlow Road Tollgate Replica near Rhododendron, Oregon. Image taken September 20, 2011.
Image, 2011, Barlow Road Tollgate Replica, Mount Hood, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Barlow Road Tollgate Replica near Rhododendron, Oregon. Image taken September 20, 2011.


"The 6-day Journey" ...
"Most travelers over the Barlow Road shared a similar experience. If possible, they camped overnight at Gate Creek or Tygh Valley. They attempted to rest their livestock and lighten their loads by abandoning any unneeded items. Early the next day they set out for a long drive up the eastern slopes of the Cascades to reach White River where they camped along the western bank below the mouth of Barlow Creek. If all went well, the next day they advanced to the upper reaches of Barlow Creek and camped in the deep forest east of Barlow Pass. After about 1860 a forest fire in that area created what emigrants called "The Deadening", a site subsequently known as Devil's Half Acre. The third day travelers pressed over Barlow Pass and descended to Summit Meadow. Their livestock were desperately hungry but found only "sour" sedges or browse of cut willow and alder limbs.

The fourth day often proved a trial: the transit of the boggy lower slopes of Mount Hood where, in 1849, the U.S. Army's Mounted Riflemen were compelled to abandon their heavily-loaded wagons and cache military supplies at what later became known as Government Camp. If a slow wagon got in the way, or if oxen died, as was sometimes the case, travelers might be caught on the one-way trace on Laurel Hill and have to spend the night literally in the middle of the road. If lucky, however, they made the difficult descent of Laurel Hill and passed down the Zigzag drainage to camp at a small clearing near the present Rhododendron, or, by the 1870s, near the Tollgate just east of that community. The fifth day involved a long drive but usually good road. By 1848 most travelers took the south bank route, passing down the south bank of the Sandy River to above its confluence with the Salmon River. There they forded to the north bank, passed through heavily forested Mensinger Bottom, ascended the Devil's Backbone, and pushed on to the second crossing of the Sandy River. And on the sixth day -- provided all had gone well -- they ascended the hillside to present Sandy and drove on to Philip Foster's farm at Eagle Creek."


Source:    Stephen Dow Beckham and Richard C. Hanes, 1992, The Barlow Road, Clackamas County, Oregon, Inventory Project, Historic Context, 1845-1919, prepared for the Clackamas County Department of Transportation and Development, August 1992.


"The Poor Man's Route" ...
"The development of steamboat and portage services in the Gorge of the Columbia River also had important impact on use of the Barlow Road. In 1850 entrepreneurs established a north bank portage system between the Upper and Lower Cascades. They steadily improved this route from mule-drawn cart on a tramway to a full portage system with warehouses, inclines, hotels, and steamboat connections. In 1855 Joseph Ruckel and Harrison Olmstead launched a competing portage operation along the Oregon shore from the Upper Cascades to the mouth of Tanner Creek. At the Middle Cascades they constructed an incline and warehouse to serve steamboats in those months when vessels could ascend beyond the upper end of Bradford Island. These improvements competed with the Barlow Road. They created relatively safe, efficient, and speedy connections for both passengers and freight. Cost for services, however, was the major element. The portage companies literally charged "all the traffic would bear" (Gill 1924).

In 1860 the Oregon Steam Navigation Company consolidated portage interests in the Gorge. The clever manipulations of Capt. John Ainsworth and his partners led to a takeover of the Bardford & Company operations on the north bank of the Columbia and, at the same time, purchase of the Ruckel and Olmstead line along the Oregon shore. Ainsworth then traveled to California, purchased a small locomotive, the "Oregon Pony", obtained track, shipped materials to the Gorge, and constructed in 1862 a portage railroad along the base of the cliffs from Tanner Creek east to present Cascade Locks, Oregon. With its steamboats and Gorge railroad, the O.S.N. Company emerged during the Civil War as the region's transportation monopoly. The discovery of gold in Idaho and Montana in 1862 and the rushes to that region fueled the flow of goods and passengers and confirmed the value of the company's investments. The Barlow Road thus by the Civil War became the "poor man's" route or trace, perhaps more useful for livestock drovers. It was an arduous, time-consuming, but cheaper alternative to the Columbia Gorge."


Source:    Stephen Dow Beckham and Richard C. Hanes, 1992, The Barlow Road, Clackamas County, Oregon, Inventory Project, Historic Context, 1845-1919, prepared for the Clackamas County Department of Transportation and Development, August 1992.



Managing the Barlow Road (1846 to 1912) ...

"For two years following the construction, Captain Barlow personally collected the toll. In 1846 according to his report "one hundred and forty-five wagons, fifteen hundred and fifty-nine head of horses, mules and horned cattle, and one drove of sheep" passed through the toll gates.

From 1848 to 1862 the road was leased by Barlow to various operators, among whom were Philip Foster and Joseph Young. These men did little except collect the tolls and the highway lapsed into an almost impassable condition. (There is scanty material concerning the operation of the road during these years. It is probable that the California gold rush and the Indian troubles diverted men's attention from internal improvements. During one year at least the toll gates were unguarded.)

In October, 1862, the Mount Hood Wagon Road Company, capitalized at twenty-five thousand dollars, was organized to take over and reconstruct the old road. This enterprise appears to have been a failure but in May, 1864, a new company called the Cascade Road and Bridge Company was incorporated.

This organization incorporated by Joseph Young, Egbert Alcott, Stephen Coleman, Frederick Sievers and Francis Revenue, made extensive improvements in the route, building bridges and making corduroy roads across the swamps.

In 1882 the road was deeded to the Mount Hood and Barlow Road Company ...   These men shortened and improved the route and constructed an important branch road. The Mount Hood and Barlow Road Company, now under different manament, still operates the road (note: written in 1912)."


Source:    Walter Bailey, 1912, "The Barlow Road", IN: "The Quarterly of the Oregon Historical Society", vol.XIII, September 1912, p.287-296.


Timeline ... The Roads of Mount Hood ... Barlow Road, Territorial Stage Road, Mount Hood Loop Highway, and U.S. Highway 26

Jim Thompkins wrote in "Discovering Laurel Hill and the Barlow Road" (1996, 2002):

"... [in addition to the Barlow Road] ... There were three more flurries of road building in Oregon: the stage roads of the 1850-60s, the first paved roads of the 1920s, and the freeway boom of the 1950-60s. On Laurel Hill it is possible to see at one place the Barlow Road, the Territorial Stage Road, the Mt. Hood Loop Highway (1925 original) and the modern US 26."


1845:
In 1845 pioneer Samuel Barlow attempted to build a road and take the first wagons around the south side of Mount Hood. While this first attempt didn't succeed (winter descended upon them) Barlow continued west to Oregon City. In December 1845 Barlow petitioned the Oregon government to grant him authority to build the first wagon road around the peak, and to charge tolls. This road, known as the "Barlow Road", was constructed in the summer of 1846 and the road opened for the 1846 wagon trains. This road was improved each summer and a toll was collected every year until 1918.

  • "The Barlow Road was the first place on the 2,100 mile Oregon Trail where tolls were charged. When the road opened in 1846, tolls were $5.00 per wagon and 10 cents for every head of livestock. Five dollars was about one week's wages, but consider the alternative -- floating down the Columbia River in boats or rafts cost nearly $50.00! By 1863, tolls had changed to $2.50 per wagon and team, 75 cents for horse and rider, and 10 cents for other livestock. -- [U.S. National Park Service website, 2009]

  • "Reuban Gant is recorded to have driven the first wagon across the new road in 1846; Barlow reported to the Oregon Spectator -- the first newspaper published west of the Rockies -- that 145 wagons and nearly 1600 head of livestock made it over the Road that first year." -- [Oregon-California Trails Association website, 2011, "Final Leg of the Oregon Trail"]

1866:
In 1866 the improvements to the Barlow Road were completed, with the road going over Laurel Hill instead of down Laurel Hill, and the road opened for two-way travel over its entire 130 mile length. Covered wagons now competed with faster stagecoaches.

1903:
In 1903, motorized autos began using the Barlow Road. On August 29, 1903, John B. Kelley drove the first car through the tollgate (located near Rhododendron) and up to Mount Hood, returning to Government Camp with 50 pounds of snow.

1911:
In 1911 E. Henry Wemme purchased the Barlow Road from the Mount Hood & Barlow Road Company, with the intention of making improvements catering to the automobile. In 1914 Wemme died and willed the road to his attorney, who, in 1917 presented it to the State of Oregon. Tolls were removed and the State took over maintenance.

1919:
In 1919 construction started on Oregon Highway 35, beginning in Hood River and designed to connect with the Barlow Road. In 1924 the road was completed, opening to traffic in 1925, creating the "Mount Hood Loop Highway". Highway 35 was open only during summers until 1967 when road improvements and snow removal began.

1950s and 1960s:
In the 1950s and 1960s major freeway construction began, straightening out curves, creating and paving lanes, and bypassing small communities. The Oregon Highway 26 and Highway 35 loop, extending from Portland to Hood River, and became known as the "Mount Hood Scenic Byway".


Image, 2009, Mount Hood, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mount Hood from U.S. Highway 26 at Laurel Hill. Parts of Highway 26 follow the old Barlow Road, a part of the Oregon Trail. Image taken August 16, 2009.


"God never made a mountain that he didn't make a way to get over it." ... (Samuel Barlow, 1845).


National Register of Historic Places ...
In 1974, the "Rock Corral on the Barlow Road" (also known as "Oregon Trail (Barlow Road) Campsite"), west of Brightwood off U.S. 26 near Sandy River, was added to the National Register of Historic Places (Event #74001673), commemorating exploration, settlement, transportation, and social history (1825 to 1849).

In 1974, the "Oregon Trail, Barlow Road Segment" (also known as "South Alternate of Barlow Road Segment at Woldwood Recreation"), northwest of Wemme, Oregon, was added to the National Register of Historic Places (Event #74001679), commemorating exploration, settlement, transportation, commerce, and social history (1825 to 1899).

In 1992, the "Barlow Road" (also known as the "Oregon Trail"), roughly north of the Salmon and the White Rivers from Rhododendron to southwest of Wamic, Mount Hood National Forest, was added to the National Register of Historic Places (Event #92000334), commemorating transportation, exploration, and settlement (1825 to 1924).


Modern day Tollgates and Barlow Roads ...

Image, 2011, Tollgate Campground, Barlow Road, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Tollgate Campground sign, Rhododendron, Oregon. Image taken September 20, 2011.
Image, 2012, Street scene, Barlow Road, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Tollgate Inn, Sandy, Oregon. Image taken July 6, 2012.
Image, 2012, Street scene, Barlow Road, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Barlow Trail Roadhouse, Welches, Oregon. Image taken July 6, 2012.

The Barlow Trail Roadhouse was built in 1926. For a few months it was a general store before becoming the "Barlow Trail Inn". Today it is the "Barlow Trail Roadhouse", a popular local restaurant in Welches, Oregon.


Barlow, Oregon, and the Barlow House ...
Barlow, Oregon, lies approximately one mile southwest of Oregon City, and was named after William Barlow, the son of Samuel Barlow, founder of the Barlow Road.

"Barlow is on the main line of the Southern Pacific Company in Clackamas County and also on the Pacific Highway East (Highway 99E). It was named for William Barlow. He was a son of Samuel K. Barlow, who opened the Barlow Road. ... The Barlows came to Oregon in 1845, traveling over the Cascade Range by what was later known as the Barlow Road, and arrived in Oregon City Christmas night. William Barlow engaged in various enterprises and, among other things, in 1859 started the first black walnut trees grown in Oregon. Samuel K. Barlow bought the donation land claim of Thomas McKay on September 17, 1850, and afterward sold this place to his son William. The railroad was built through the place in 1870, and the station was first named Barlows for William Barlow. Barlow post office was established February 7, 1871, and was finally closed January 3, 1975." [McArthur and McArthur, 2003, "Oregon Geographic Names", Oregon Historical Society Press]

William Barlow's house, now known as the "Barlow House", was built in 1885. In 1977 it was added to the National Register of Historic Places (Person/Architecture/Engineering, #77001098).

"The William Barlow House, constructed in 1885, is a fine example of High Victorian Italianate residential architecture. It is a two-story house with the main section measuring approximately 35' x 45' and an ell extending from the southeast rear section of the house measuring about 20' x 25'. Also included in the nomination are several out-buildings that predate the house. Approximately 150 yards to the northeast is a barn dating from the 1850s or 1860s. Fifty yards from the northeast corner of the house is a carriage house and fifty yards from the southeast corner is a combination woodshed/smokehouse. Approximately 100 yards to the southeast of the house is a building referred to as the tenant house. These three out-buildings probably date from the 1850s or 1860s, and they all have the interesting feature of a fanlight on the west wall. ...

A unique feature of the Barlow House, distinguishing it form others in Oregon, is the two rows of black walnut trees extending from the house to Highway 99E. The trees are the earliest black walnut trees in Oregon, planted in 1859. Before the highway was constructed, the trees extended 300 yards to the original main road."


"In 1850, Sam Barlow purchased the land on which the present house is located from Thomas McKay, a former employee of the Hudson's Bay Company. There was probably a house on the property when Barlow purchased the land, and part of the 1,450 acres was cultivated.

William Barlow first settled on a farm on the Clackamas River near Oregon City. In his memoirs, William referred to Oregon Trail travelers stopping at his farm, so it must have been either on or near the actual route of the trail. He sold this Clackamas River farm in 1848 to an Oregon Trail traveler and engaged in several enterprises in the Oregon City area. Sometime during the 1850s, William bought his father's farm. Sam Barlow moved from his farm to Canemah, near Oregon City, where he died in 1867.

Under William Barlow, the farm developed into a small community. In 1859, William planted the first black walnut trees in Oregon. They were planted in two rows from the house to the main road through Barlow, about 300 yards from the house. In 1870, the railroad was built through the Willamette Valley and the route went through the Barlow property. A station was built and named for William Barlow. Barlow and his brother-in-law, Hodges, built and financed one of the first river steamboats on the upper Willamette River - the "Canemah". On his farm and in the community of Barlow, William Barlow started a sawmill, a gristmill, the first post office, and the Barlow Bank and Land Development Company.

The William Barlow house was constructed in 1885 soon after the first Barlow House burned (probably in 1883). The new house was constructed on the same site as the original house, maintaining the same orientation to the out-buildings. It is not known whether Barlow hired an architect to prepare the plans for his house, but the evidence suggests he did not. The records do, however, show that Barlow hired Mr. Kidd, master carpenter, to supervise the construction of his house. ..."


Source:    "Barlow (William) House", 1977, National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form #77001098.


"The Barlow House has had few exterior alterations since the historic period. The original front porch was removed by the second owners and an encircling porch was added. The encircling porch was removed and the original porch was restored by the fourth owner, Virginia Miller (c. 1990). ...

Ell added, after 1906 . ...

Carriage House: estimated date built: c. 1930. ...

Wellhouse: estimated date built: c. 1905. ...

Ornamental plantings; mature deciduous trees. The two rows of black walnut trees, planted in 1859, extend from the house to the highway. The rows were shortened due to the construction of the railroad and the highway, however, they remain a prominent feature and add to the character of the historic buildings. The black walnuts were brought around the Horn for Wm. Barlow. He started hundreds of seedlings which were planted in the two rows at this site; the remaining seedllings were sold around the region and most old black walnut trees are attributed to Wm. Barlow's seedlings.

The Barlow House is located on the south side of Highway 99E, a busy and noisy, four-lane thoroughfare and the Southern Pacific Railroad. The house is set back from the road. The side is level with two rows of black walnut trees leading to the house and ornamental plantings surrounding the house. Across the road, to the north, are railroad tracks and commercial buildings. On the east there is a field and a commercial building. On the west and south there are fields. The area is a mixture of commercial and agricultural uses. The house is located just outside the Barlow city limits and the Samuel Barlow Donation Land Claim."




"The Barlow House has had few exterior alterations since the historic period. The original front porch was removed by the second owners and an encircling porch was added. The encircling porch was removed and the original porch was restored by the fourth owner, Virginia Miller. In addition to the house, there are three outbuildings which are believed to date from the historic period. The wash house/coal shed is a two-story building clad with wide drop siding with cornerboards and rake boards with the wash room on the first floor, the coal shed attached to the back and the upstairs was used for drying clothes. The carriage house is a one-story building clad with narrow drop siding with cornerboards and rake boards, and the well house is a small one-story rectangular building clad with cast stone. There is one other building on the property, a shed, which is believed to post-date the historic period. Originally, there was a circular drive and fountain in front of the house, two barns, a carriage house, an orchard, a smokehouse, a large machine shed, a chicken house, a four-bedroom tenant house, hog sheds, and a sawmill on the property. The tenant house was used as living quarters for the Barlow's negro servants, Rosa and John. It was later used as a granary when it was moved to the fields after 1906 and burned down circa 1982. The sawmill was located on the original donation land claim on the back part of the property near the Molalla River. The two rows of black walnut trees, planted in 1859, extend from the house to the highway. The rows were shortened due to the construction of the railroad and the highway, however, they remain a prominent feature and add to the character of the historic buildings. The Barlow House is significant as an example of the Italianate style and for its association with William Barlow. The property is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The house is additionally significant as a singular example of an Italianate style dwelling, dating from the Progressive Era (1884-1913), listed on the Clackamas County Cultural Resource Inventory for the Canby/Barlow study area."




Source:    Oregon Historic Sites Database, 2008, downloaded 2016.


Historical Photo, 1905, Barlow House, Barlow, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
HISTORICAL Image, The Barlow House, Barlow, Oregon, from the "Sunday Oregonian", October 8, 1905. View showing the Black Walnut Trees planted in 1859. Courtesy Historic Oregon Newspaper Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016.
Image, 2015, Barlow House, Barlow, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
The Barlow House, Barlow, Oregon. Wash house/coal shed, built ca.1860, is on the right, with its ell built after 1906. Image taken from moving car on Oregon Highway 99E. Image taken January 8, 2015.
Image, 2015, Barlow House, Barlow, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
The Barlow House, Barlow, Oregon. Wash house/coal shed, built ca.1860, is on the right. The wellhouse, built ca.1905, is visible between the main house and the wash house/coal shed. Image taken from moving car on Oregon Highway 99E. Image taken January 8, 2015.
Image, 2015, Barlow House, Barlow, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
The Barlow House, Barlow, Oregon. The Carriage House, built ca.1930, is just visible on the left. Image taken from moving car on Oregon Highway 99E. Image taken January 8, 2015.
Image, 2015, Barlow House, Barlow, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
The Barlow House, Barlow, Oregon. Image taken from moving car on Oregon Highway 99E. Image taken January 8, 2015.
Image, 2016, Barlow House, Barlow, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
The Barlow House, Barlow, Oregon. Image taken from moving car on Oregon Highway 99E. Image taken July 7, 2016.


Follow the Barlow Road ... (east to west)
  • The Dalles to Tygh Valley
  • Tygh Valley to Wamic
  • Following the White River
  • Following Barlow Creek
  • Side Trip to Mount Hood
  • Barlow Pass to Oregon Highway 35
  • Summit Meadows to Still Creek Campground
  • Government Camp to Laurel Hill
  • Descending Laurel Hill
  • Laurel Hill to Rhododendron
  • Rhododendron to Brightwood ... the Road Divides
    • Rhododendron to Brightwood ... North Route
    • Rhododendron to Brightwood ... South Alternative of the Barlow Road
  • Following the Sandy River ... Brightwood to Sandy (Marmot Road and the Devil's Backbone)
  • Crossing the Sandy River
  • Sandy to Eagle Creek
  • Crossing the Clackamas River
  • Clackamas River to Oregon City
Follow the trail .........

Image, 2011, The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Barlow Road sign, The Dalles, Oregon. Image taken September 28, 2011.
Image, 2012, Barlow Road Laurel Hill, Mount Hood, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Historic sign, Laurel Hill, Barlow Road. Image taken July 6, 2012.
Image, 2011, End of the Oregon Trail, Oregon City, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Sign, "End of the Oregon Trail", Oregon City, Oregon. Image taken October 22, 2011.






HOME
NORTHWEST JOURNEY
COLUMBIA RIVER IMAGES
THE BARLOW ROAD
THE COLUMBIA RIVER HIGHWAY



*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:    Baker Cabin Historical Society website, 2013;    Bailey, W., 1912, "The Barlow Road", IN: "The Quarterly of the Oregon Historical Society", vol.XIII, September 1912, p.287-296;    "Barlow Road", 5th edition, 1991, published by the Clackamas County Historical Society and Wasco County Historical Society;    Beckham, S.D., and Hanes, R.C., 1992, The Barlow Road, Clackamas County, Oregon, Inventory Project, Historic Context, 1845-1919, prepared for the Clackamas County Department of Transportation and Development, August 1992;    "bridgehunter.com" website, 2013, Historic and Notable Bridges of the U.S.;    Clackamas County (Or.), 1988, "Maps of the Barlow Road: Mt. Hood to Oregon City, Clackamas County Planning and Economic Development Division, Oregon, published by the U.S. National Park Service, Oregon City, Oregon;       Clackamas County (Or.), 1993, Barlow Road Historic Corridor: Westernmost Segment of the Oregon Trail: Background Report & Management Plan, Clackamas County Department of Transportation and Development.    Clackamas County Historical Society and Wasco County Historical Society, 1991, "Barlow Road";    Duniway, A.J., 1859, Captain Gray's company, or, Crossing the plains and living in Oregon;    "HistoricOregonCity.org" website (2011), "End of the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center";    Historic Oregon Newspapers website, 2012, 2015;    McArthur, L.A., and McArthur, L.L., 2003, Oregon Geographic Names, Oregon Historical Society Press;    "mounthoodhistory.com" website, 2013;    National Register of Historic Places Inventory - 1974, Nomination Form, Rock Corral on the Barlow Road;    National Register of Historic Places Inventory - 1974, Nomination Form, Barlow Road South Alternative;    National Register of Historic Places Inventory - 1976, Nomination Form, Horace Baker Log Cabin;    National Register of Historic Places Inventory - 1986, Nomination Form, Zigzag Ranger Station;    National Register of Historic Places Inventory - 1992, Nomination Form, Barlow Road;    National Wild and Scenic River System website, 2015;    Palmer, J. "Journal of travels over the Rocky Mountains to the mouth of the Columbia River, made during the years 1845 and 1846", IN: Thwaites, R., 1906, Early Western Travels, 1748-1846, vol.XXX;    Oregon Historical Society, website, 2009;    Oregon-California Trails Association website, 2011, "Final Leg of the Oregon Trail";    Query, C.F., A History of Oregon Ferries since 1826;    "tomlaidlaw.com" website, 2011;    Tompkins, J., 1996, 2002, Discovering Laurel Hill and the Barlow Road;    U.S. Forest Service online publication "The Forest Service and the Civilian Conservation Corps: 1933-42", Chapter 14, originally from Alison T. Otis, 1986, "The Forest Service and the Civilian Conservation Corps: 1933-42", U.S. Forest Service publication;    U.S. Bureau of Land Management website, 2011, "Oregon Trail Interpretive Center";    U.S. Bureau of Land Management "Wildwood Recreation Site" brochure, 2007;    U.S. Forest Service website, 2011, Mount Hood National Forest;    U.S. National Park Service website, 2009, Whitman Mission National Historic Site;    Wasco History website, 2012, Barlow Trail, taken from the Mount Hood National Forest USDA Pamphlet #797-672/4;    Wigg, M., 1998, Mountain Biking Oregon, A Falcon Guide;   
TheBarlowRoad.com/barlow_road.html
© 2016, Lyn Topinka, "TheBarlowRoad.com", All rights reserved.
Images are NOT to be downloaded from this website.
November 2015