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"The Barlow Road ... Sandy to Eagle Creek"
Includes ... Barlow Road ... Sandy ... Foster's Farm ... Eagle Creek ...
Image, 2013, Sign, Barlow Road, click to enlarge
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Barlow Road sign, Foster Farm, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2013.


The Barlow Road ...
The Barlow Road was a part of the Oregon Trail. The road was authorized by the Oregon Legislature in 1845, and by September 1846, it made its way around the south side of Mount Hood. This 80-to-110-mile road provided an alternative to the dangerous and expensive route that used rafts to transport wagons down the Columbia River. The Barlow Road began at The Dalles, Oregon, headed south through Dufur and Tygh Valley (which some folks consider the start of the Barlow Road), then turned west at Gate Creek and generally followed the White River before it headed north through Barlow Pass and Government Camp. It then passed through "Tollgate #5" near today's Rhododendron and continued to the community of Sandy, where it turned west and ended up at Oregon City.


Follow the Barlow Road ... (east to west)


 
Sandy to Eagle Creek

Overview ...

From the second crossing of the Sandy River, the Barlow Road route generally follows SE Ten Eyck Road uphill and then passes through today's Sandy, Oregon. The Road then heads west towards Eagle Creek and Philip Foster's Farm, with Oregon Highway 211 generally following this route. From Philip Foster's Farm the Barlow Road route continues west for another 15 miles before ending in Oregon City.


Sandy, Oregon ...

The original path of the Barlow Road route follows SE Ten Eyck Road until it reaches Sandy, Oregon, where it turns west for four blocks, following Pioneer Boulevard (today's Oregon Highway 26 eastbound), and then turns south-southwest following Oregon Highway 211 towards Eagle Creek and Philip Foster's Farm. Highlights in these four blocks include the Sandy City Hall where today a plaque sits commemorating the Barlow Road, the Sandy Historical Museum, Centennial Plaza, Veterans Memorial Square, Joe's Donut Shop, and Meining Memorial Park.

The area of today's Oregon community of Sandy was first settled in 1853 by the Revenue family and was first known as "Revenue". Pioneers however called all the land north and east of Eagle Creek (the location of where Barlow Road travelers first encountered civilization) "Sandy". About 1870 Richard Gerdes settled near the Revenue property, opened a store, and in 1873 he applied for a Post Office called "Sandy".


Image, 2012, Sandy, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Barlow Road route sign at Pioneer Boulevard (Oregon Highway 26) and SE Ten Eyck Road, Sandy, Oregon. Today's SE Ten Eyck Road follows the old Barlow Road route from the "Lower Crossing" of the Sandy River and the location of the second Tollgate. Image taken July 13, 2012.
Image, 2010, Sandy, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Barlow Road Mural, "Peaceful Vistas", Sandy, Oregon. Mural depicts pioneer family on the Barlow Road, painted by Roger Cooke, 1993. There are several murals throughout the community of Sandy. This one depicts a family on the Oregon Trail. Image taken July 17, 2010.
Image, 2015, Sandy, Oregon, click to enlarge
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On the Barlow Road ... Sandy Area Historical Museum, Sandy, Oregon. Image taken September 23, 2015.
Image, 2015, Sandy, Oregon, click to enlarge
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On the Barlow Road ... Sandy Centennial Plaza, Sandy, Oregon. Image taken September 23, 2015.
Image, 2010, Sandy, Oregon, click to enlarge
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On the Barlow Road ... Veteran's Memorial Square, Sandy, Oregon. Image taken July 17, 2010.
Image, 2010, Sandy, Oregon, click to enlarge
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On the Barlow Road ... Veteran's Memorial Square, Sandy, Oregon. Image taken July 28, 2010.
Image, 2010, Sandy, Oregon, click to enlarge
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On the Barlow Road ... Joe's Donut Shop, Sandy, Oregon. Image taken July 17, 2010.

Sandy, Oregon ... City Hall ... Highway 26 crossing the Barlow Road

(T2S, R4E, Sec.13)

THIS OREGON STONE PLACED HERE
ON FEBRUARY 13, 1973 TO COMMEMORATE THE CENTENNIAL
OF THE FOUNDING OF THE CITY OF SANDY BY THE OPENING
OF ITS FIRST POST OFFICE, MARKS

THE BARLOW ROAD

Near this spot, passing from N.E. to S.W., the Barlow Road served for nearly 60 years (1846 into the 20th Century) as the main pioneer route into western Oregon. In December, 1845, Samuel K. Barlow and William Rector, in advance of their imperiled wagon train from The Dalles, were met just below this ridge at the Sandy River by a recue party from Oregon City and taken to the Philip Foster Farm at Eagle Creek. By the next Spring, Barlow had a territorial franchise for his road around Mt. Hood. 145 wagons with some 1,500 livestock came over the Barlow Road in that first year. It operated, in part, as a planked road, until 1912 when the franchise was bought by E. Henry Wemme who bequeathed it to the people of Oregon. A conservative estimate is that during the first quarter century of its use more than 50,000 pioneers came over this part of the Oregon Trail."


Source:    Information plaque outside of the Sandy City Hall, 2012.

Image, 2012, Sandy, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Plaque commemorating the Barlow Road, Sandy City Hall, Sandy, Oregon. Location where Oregon Highway 26 crosses the Barlow Road. Image taken July 13, 2012.
Image, 2012, Sandy, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Plaque commemorating the Barlow Road, Sandy City Hall, Sandy, Oregon. Location where Oregon Highway 26 crosses the Barlow Road. Image taken July 13, 2012.

Sandy to the Philip Foster Farm ...

According to the Clackamas County's Barlow Road Background Report and Management Plan (1993):

"Until possibly as late as 1853 this eight mile segment essentially constituted the final day's journey of the emigrants to their first encounter with civilization, the Philip Foster farm. A number of emigrants make brief reference to this route segment that generally passes through rolling farmland with two deep stream courses to cross. ... Most of this segment south of Sandy is now in agricultural use and has been since the 1850s-60s."

The two stream segments are Tickle Creek and Deep Creek. Both are crossed today by Oregon Highway 211.


Tupper Road and the crossing of Tickle Creek ...

"The first portion of the route segment contains no site sections but several isolate road sections. The route passes in a southwesterly direction from the Ten Eyck Road and State Highway 26 intersection generally following the current Pioneer Blvd. alignment before departing in a more southerly direction to Tupper Road. Tupper Road is a remaining segment of the 1920s Market Road #33 which likely followed the previously used wagon road route in the area immediately on the south side of Sandy. The Barlow Road route appears to generally coincide with the Tupper Road alignment to the bottom of the drainage.

There the old route appears to deviate from the market road which is cut into the north facing hill slope departing the drainage. The wagon route, with possible traces constituting an isolate road section, traverses up the hillside east of Tupper Road through a wooded north facing hillside, disappearing at the top of the hill near the edge of the Kari Terrace residential development. The route then passes through the residential area in a southerly direction, next traversing the highly disturbed old Oja Lumber Mill site before crossing Tupper Road descending a south facing, wooded hillside to Tickle Creek.

The wagon route crosses Tickle Creek and turns southeastward, ascending a steep hillside, first following a current residential drive and then becoming visible as an abandoned roadbed near the top of the hill. This isolate road section displays some characteristics, such as a width greater than 10 feet and general consistency of grade, suggesting it was likely the original wagon road improved in the 1920s into the market road. The route again disappears at the top of the hill where it apparently turned back in a southwest orientation, traversing level fields before joining the current highway alignment. Road remains of this section are shown in an early aerial photo taken around 1950, and is also dramatically indicated by the orientation of a still standing 1880s residence.

The wagon route then generally follows the highway alignment for some distance, deviating briefly in several locations with isolated road remains still apparent. A distinct, but very short, swale is located on the north shoulder of the highway, a short distance west of the highway and Arletha Court road intersection. Further west, 1800 feet east of 362nd Drive intersection, also in immediate proximity to the north shoulder of the highway is a short isolated section of very good, abandoned road remains, possibly more related to the market road due to its distinctiveness and steadiness of grade."


Source:    Clackamas County (Or.), 1993, Barlow Road Historic Corridor: Westernmost Segment of the Oregon Trail: Background Report & Management Plan, Clackamas County Department of Transportation and Development.

[T2S, R4E, Sec.28]


Image, 1992, Barlow Road, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Detail, 1992 Map, Early Barlow Road heading from Sandy, Oregon, crossing Tickle Creek and heading to Deep Creek.

Source:   Beckham, S.D., and Hanes, R.C., 1992, The Barlow Road, Clackamas County, Oregon, Inventory Project, Historic Context, 1845-1919, prepared for the Clackamas County Department of Transportation and Development, August 1992.

  • Orange - Barlow Road.
  • Blue - SE Ten Eyck Road and Oregon Highway 26/Pioneer Boulevard (upper right), and Oregon Highway 211 and Tupper Road (diagonal route and lower loop).

Highway 211 and the crossing of Deep Creek ...

Today's Oregon Highway 211 generally follows the old Barlow Road, linking Sandy, Oregon, with the Philip Foster Farm in Eagle Creek. The road crosses Deep Creek a little over four miles from Sandy.

"As the old route approaches Deep Creek to the west it begins more substantial deviations from the current highway alignment. A short distance before beginning the descent to Deep Creek, while traversing the low rolling hills, the old route, according to early surveyor notes, diverges from the highway alignment a short distance to the north, passing through present day blueberry fields.

Upon beginning the long descent from the north, the route according to the 1855 surveyors' notes apparently crossed the current highway alignment briefly to the east of the current highway, passing around the east end of the toe of a small ridge located just above the highway and Tickle Creek Road intersection. Some partial swales are located along the east shoulder of the highway, but association with the old route is not apparent.

Between the Tickle Creek Road intersection with the highway and the Judd Road intersection across the Deep Creek drainage three generations of road alignments are evident: a site section of the wagon road; the subesequent market road; and, the current highway. From the Tickle Creek Road intersection the market road generally follows Tickle Creek Road to Leewood Lane, then along Leewood Lane to where it crosses Deep Creek at the current highway crossing location, but differing in orientation.

The wagon route in the immediate area is evidenced by a linear, shallow swale through an undeveloped woodland area near the west shoulder of the highway, below the Tickle Creek Road intersection. The swale disappears at the boundary of the adjoining residential development and apparently crosses Deep Creek a short distance downstream from the highway and market road location in the vicinity of a current foot bridge. No road remains are evindent on either bank of Deep Creek.

Upon crossing Deep Creek, the market road and wagon road become evident again to the south on the east shoulder of the current highway alignment a short distance (approximately 150 feet) from the Deep Creek streambed. Remains of the market road are very distinct as it first climbs the north facing hill in a southerly direction, diverging from the highway alignment, before curving to the southwest joining Sofic Lane alignment and crossing Highway 211, becoming very distinct again west of the highway.

The market road then makes a broad curving sweep through another undeveloped woodland area before turning back to the south and crossing the highway alignment again, this time while ascending a steep, but low north facing hillside. Upon reaching the top of the hill, the market road remains again turn back to the southwest, generally joining the highway alignment near the Judd Road intersection.

The older Barlow Road remains follow a different route than the market road or the highway; however, the remains are much less distinct. In addition, the older route more closely conforms to the current highway alignment, hence was more impacted by the highway construction than the market road. Nonetheless, several remains are still recognizable. Upon crossing Deep Creek and the highway alignment a short, deep highly eroded swale is located just above the market roadbed, near the highway east shoulder. The remains disappear at the top of the hill where erosion has been less of a factor in enhancing the swale.

The Barlow route then apparently follows the current highway alignment up a gradual grade to the south before becoming visible again as a relatively short, shallow linear swale that parallels the west shoulder of the highway before apparently crossing to the east side. East of the highway Barlow Road remains become very distinct as the road course begins climbing up a steep hillside, first below the market roadbed described above, and then turning southwest directly uphill while still climbing and crossing the market road remains at the top of the hill. The road remains cease upon crossing the market road as it appears to approach the Judd Road intersection."


Source:    Clackamas County (Or.), 1993, Barlow Road Historic Corridor: Westernmost Segment of the Oregon Trail: Background Report & Management Plan, Clackamas County Department of Transportation and Development.

[T2S, R4E, Sec.28]


Image, 2013, Oregon Highway 211 at Deep Creek, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Oregon Highway 211 heading down to Deep Creek, Oregon. View looking east. Image taken May 4, 2013.

Deep Creek to Jackknife Road ...

"The Barlow Road route apparently crosses the highway at the Judd Road intersection and then closely parallels the highway alignment past Forresters Cemetery where it begins a descent toward the former Philip Foster farm site. A very short shallow swale is visible just north of the cemetery and very distinct road remains occur southwest of the cemetery on a south facing hillside. Though a lengthy, broad, deep swale remains, it has been partially filled by field clearing debris at the top of the hill, intersected by a residential drive and two-lane highway in the middle, and used for a trash dump below the highway. A short distance below the dump the swale passes through some blackberries and disappears into a field.

The next section of the route has no remains as it apparently continues to descend toward Foster's, passing through pasture land, a tree farm, and blackberry growth. A short swale becomes apparent again at the base of this particular descent in an undeveloped woodland setting. A much longer shallow swale is evident a short distance further as it courses toward Jacknife Road near its intersection with Highway 211. Near the north shoulder of Jackknife Road the swale is truncated by residential development."



"This segment of the Barlow Road is composed of four short sections interrupted by State Highway 211 (a two-laned paved road) and agricultural and residential development.

The road segment begins on a southfacing hillside above the north shoulder of State Highway 211, approximately 500 feet west of the pioneer Forrester Cemetery. A deep, winding swale meanders downhill to the north shoulder of Highway 211 along a treeless corridor in a southerly direction through an undeveloped portion of an agricultural area. The 200 foot long subsegment is intersected by a graveled residential drive. The remains of old power poles with glass insulators and threaded wooden insulator supports are within the swal toward the upper end.

The next section is a short, but deep swale to the south, immmediately across State Highway 211. Near the shoulder of the highway, it has been used for a small dump. From there it passes through blackberry growth and curves to the west before disappearing in an adjoining cleared field.

The third section, located farther to the west is very short, approximately 25 feet in length, and is a shallow, linear swale oriented directly down a low, gently sloping hillslope within dense vegetation in a woodland setting. A cleared field is at the top of the hill and a small pond is located at the eastern edge of horse pasture at the base of the hill.

The final road section is a 200 foot long shallow linear swale. The swale begins a short distance south of the small pond, on the east edge of a horse pasture. The old road remains extend toward the southwest through an open, grazed woodland setting before disappearing near the northeast corner of a residential structure located on Jackknife Road. The historic setting has been greatly altered by the built environment of residneces, agricultural fields and roads." ... [Beckham and Hanes, 1992]




Source:    Clackamas County (Or.), 1993, Barlow Road Historic Corridor: Westernmost Segment of the Oregon Trail: Background Report & Management Plan, Clackamas County Department of Transportation and Development.


On to Philip Foster's Farm ...

"The remainder of the route segment toward Foster's has no visible remains as it crosses Jackknife Road, sheep pasture land, and finally joining the current highway alignment in front of Eagle Creek School upon its final descent toward Goose Creek."


Source:    Clackamas County (Or.), 1993, Barlow Road Historic Corridor: Westernmost Segment of the Oregon Trail: Background Report & Management Plan, Clackamas County Department of Transportation and Development.

Philip Foster Farm ...

The first sign of "civilization" after enduring the hardships of the Barlow Road was the Philip Foster Farm, located in Eagle Creek, Oregon. At the farm the weary travelers could obtain food and needed supplies. Philip Foster was Samuel Barlow's "financial backer" in developing the Barlow Toll Road.

Philip Foster and his family, including his brother-in-law Francis W. Pettygrove, sailed around Cape Horn and arrived in Oregon City in 1843. The two men founded a general store in Oregon City. In 1844 Pettygrove laid out and named the city of Portland while Foster staked out a 640-acre Donation Land Claim (DLC) on the banks of Eagle Creek, a tributary to the Clackamas River. In 1846 Foster built a log cabin and grist mill, established a garden and planted an orchard. He supplied the Barlow Road immigrants with fresh meat and vegetables. Later he built a house, a barn in 1874, and, after the house burned in 1880, in 1883 he built the current house, a storehouse, and dug a well.

In 1980 the "Philip Foster Farm" of Eagle Creek, Oregon, was added to the National Register of Historic Places, (Person/Event/Architecture #80003305).

"September 29th.   Eighteen miles travel brought us to Mr. Foster's residence, at the western base of the Cascade Mountains. The sight of a white house, neat garden, loaded fruit trees, and waving corn-stalks, animated us all. ...   Dozens of wagons, hundreds of immigrants, and herds of poor cattle and horses are around us. Almost six months ago we started upon our journey, and now that the goal is reached. How we look! Dirty, sallow and ragged; our poor beasts are walking skeletons, our wagons and their covers travel-soiled; our ranks sadly thinned, and many of our hopes laid low! But such is life. 'All eternity is yet to be,' and we will look ahead. "


Source:    Abigail J. Duniway, 1859, Captain Gray's company, or, Crossing the plains and living in Oregon.

Image, 2013, Philip Foster Farm and House, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Sign, Philip Foster Farm, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken April 11, 2013.
Image, 2013, Philip Foster Farm, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Sign, National Register of Historic Places, Philip Foster Farm, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2013.
Image, 2013, Philip Foster Farm, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Philip Foster Farm, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2013.
Image, 2013, Philip Foster Farm and House, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Philip Foster Farm, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken April 11, 2013.
Image, 2013, Philip Foster Farm and House, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Philip Foster house, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2013.
Image, 2013, Philip Foster Farm and House, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Philip Foster house, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken April 11, 2013.
Image, 2013, Philip Foster Farm and House, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Interior, Philip Foster house, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2013.
Image, 2013, Philip Foster Farm, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Kitchen, Philip Foster Farm, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2013.
Image, 2013, Philip Foster Farm and House, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Bedroom, Philip Foster house, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2013.

Handmade rawhide rocking chair was brought across the Oregon Trail by Edward Knox.

Philip Foster Farm ... Prairie Schooner

Jim Thompkins wrote in his "Discovering Laurel Hill and the Barlow Road" (1996, 2002):

"... A prairie schooner is a relatively small covered wagon averaging 10-12 feet long and 4-5 feet wide. Most were converted farm wagons, although a few individuals such as freed slave Hiram Young and the Studebaker brothers made a living crafting wagons in Missouri for the Oregon Trail. Older and larger Conestogas were built for the freight trade on the National Road or Santa Fe Trail. Some early pioneers tried these large wagons on the Oregon Trail but soon discovered they were too heavy for their teams to cross the Rockies. ..."

Image, 2013, Philip Foster Farm, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Prairie Schooner, Philip Foster Farm, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2013.
Image, 2013, Philip Foster Farm, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Prairie Schooner, Philip Foster Farm, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2013.
Image, 2013, Philip Foster Farm, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Prairie Schooner, Philip Foster Farm, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2013.

Philip Foster Farm ... Lilacs

The huge lilac in front of the Philip Foster home is an Oregon Heritage Tree. It is approximately 25 feet high and is over 170 years old. According to the information sign out front:

"The original start of this lilac tree was brought from Maine to Oregon in 1843 by Mary Charlotte Foster, wife of Philip Foster, parner with Sam Barlow on the Barlow Road. The Fosters sailed around Cape Horn and Mary Charlotte planted the lilac immediately upon her arrival in Oregon City. She moved it five times, replanting it at each of her homes. It was planted in its current location in 1883."

Image, 2013, Philip Foster Farm, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Lilac out front, Philip Foster Farm, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2013.
Image, 2013, Philip Foster Farm, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Lilac out front, Philip Foster Farm, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2013.

Crossing Eagle Creek ...

From Philip Foster's Farm the early Barlow Road headed west generally following today's Dowty Road, where it traversed down to Eagle Creek. The road crosses Eagle Creek at today's Bonnie Lure State Recreation Area.

[T2S, R3E, Sec.36]


Image, 1992, Barlow Road, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Detail, 1992 Map, Early Barlow Road following today's Dowty Road and crossing Eagle Creek.

Source:   Beckham, S.D., and Hanes, R.C., 1992, The Barlow Road, Clackamas County, Oregon, Inventory Project, Historic Context, 1845-1919, prepared for the Clackamas County Department of Transportation and Development, August 1992.

  • Orange - Barlow Road.
  • Blue - Dowty Road.
Image, 2013, Eagle Creek, Oregon, click to enlarge
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SE Dowty Road heading to Eagle Creek and Bonnie Lure State Recreation Area, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2013.
Image, 2013, Eagle Creek, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Eagle Creek, looking upstream, Bonnie Lure State Recreation Area, Eagle Creek, Oregon. View from Dowty Road bridge crossing Eagle Creek. Image taken May 4, 2013.
Image, 2013, Eagle Creek, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Eagle Creek, looking upstream, Bonnie Lure State Recreation Area, Eagle Creek, Oregon. View from near Dowty Road bridge crossing Eagle Creek. Image taken May 4, 2013.
Image, 2013, Barlow Trail Dairy sign, near Eagle Creek, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Sign, Barlow Trail Dairy, "Registered Holsteins", near Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2013.


Eagle Creek to the Clackamas River ...

Excerpts from:
1993, Barlow Road Historic Corridor: Westernmost Segment of the Oregon Trail.




"Upon crossing Eagle Creek, a short swale is visible on the south bank, above the active flood plain and an access road to McIver State Park. The route then passes through a recently logged area, becoming evident again at the base of a steep bluff to the upper stream terrace. A distinct swale parallels Dowty Road and below Dowty Road as the two road courses ascent the bluff toward a natural notch in the bluff that has probably been further enhanced by subsequent road construction.

The old road course essentially crosses Dowty Road through the notch, soon diverging to the east of Dowty Road through a woodland parcel where it is evident as a ttreeless corridor parallel to Dowty Road. The past and current road courses then cross again as the Barlow route roughly follows a stream course to the west. The route then rejoins Dowty Road and apparently generally conforms to Dowty Road the remainder of the distance to Folsom Road according to early surveyor notes. This section of the route passes several springs no doubt referenced in Benjamin Cleaver's diary as the "small buggy Prairie".

The next visible site section represents the descent to the lower Clackamas River terrace. A roadbed is evident from the top of the bluff, near the Folsom Road/Samuelson Road intersection to near the base of the bluff in a northwesterly direction. This section likely corresponds to Samuel Francis' 1852 diary entry of descending "a rather bad hill to the Clackamas ...".

No doubt the roadbed was enhanced by improvements through the early years of settlement, especially since it provided access to an early mill. There is no visible evidence of the road course across the agricultural field on the lower terrace of the Clackamas River.

Upon crossing the river, no evidence of the route is visible for a distance owing to recent logging activities and possibly flood events nearer the stream bank, and its possible conformance with current Feldheimer Road in some areas as well. A distinctive unimproved, narrow road course is apparent further up the ascent toward Springwater Road. The road course begins in stand of trees within which logging activities have been limited. The course continues uphill in a southwesterly direction before disappearing near Feldheimer Road which the old course appears to cross near an early surveyor observation point and then enters a recent clear-cut area where no remains are evident. The long upward course continues to the top of the hill near Springwater Road. ...



Feldheimers Segment ...
"This segment of the Barlow Road is a continuous section of road extending downhill from the east shoulder of Heiple Road at the top edge of the prominent bluff overlooking the Clackamas River to near the base of the bluff. The road remains is a distinct compacted, narrow roadbed rapidly descending the steep bluff. Some minor road work is evident, but improvements were likely early for this segment of the Barlow Road since it provided access to "Waldrip's sawmill" by the early 1850s. This descent is mentioned in one of the emigrants diaries. Thie segment has been impacted by erosion and spoils likely from road construction of Heiple Road at the top of the bluff. Otherwise, it is in excellent condition. In 1861 land surveyors noted the location of a road corresponding to the location of this segment near the bottom of the bluff while establishing donation land claim boundaries ... ." ... [Beckham and Hanes, 1992]



The course of the Feldheimer route segment is fairly well defined, primarily from numerous surveyors' observation points, occasional road emains, and early maps. Historical sites include an old, small barn on the west bank of the Clackamas River, constructed with square nails and pegs, and the 1890s house and outbuilding on the east bank of the river."


Source:    Clackamas County (Or.), 1993, Barlow Road Historic Corridor: Westernmost Segment of the Oregon Trail: Background Report & Management Plan, Clackamas County Department of Transportation and Development.

[T2S, R3E]


Image, 1992, Barlow Road, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Detail, 1992 Map, Early Barlow Road following today's Dowty Road and crossing Eagle Creek and the Clackamas River at Feldheimer Crossing.

Source:   Beckham, S.D., and Hanes, R.C., 1992, The Barlow Road, Clackamas County, Oregon, Inventory Project, Historic Context, 1845-1919, prepared for the Clackamas County Department of Transportation and Development, August 1992.

  • Orange - Barlow Road.
  • Blue - Dowty Road, Folsom Road, and Heiple Road.



  • NEXT: Crossing the Clackamas River
    • Overview ...
    • Crossing the Clackamas River ...
    • 1st Crossing ...
      • "Feldheimer Ford and Feldheimer Ferry" ...
    • 2nd Crossing ...
      • "Carver Crossing" ...
      • Baker's Ferry, Baker Bridge, and the Carver Bridge ...
      • Baker's Cabin Historical Site ...
      • Baker's Quarry ...
      • Pioneer Church ...
    • 3rd Crossing ...
      • "Barton Crossing and LaTourette Ferry" ...
      • Barton Bridge and Barton County Park ...






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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website.

Lat/Long were obtained from plotting location on National Geographic's TOPO! program, 3.4.3, 2003.

Sources:    [See Barlow Road Sources]

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