Barlow Road banner
    HOME     NorthwestJourney.com     ColumbiaRiverImages.com
"The Barlow Road ... Side Trip to Mount Hood"
Includes ... Barlow Road ... Mount Hood ... Joel Palmer ...
Image, 2013, Sign, Barlow Road, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Barlow Road sign, Foster Farm, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2013.


The Barlow Road ...
The Barlow Road was a part of the Oregon Trail. The road was authorized by the Oregon Legislature in 1845, and by September 1846, it made its way around the south side of Mount Hood. This 80-to-110-mile road provided an alternative to the dangerous and expensive route that used rafts to transport wagons down the Columbia River. The Barlow Road began at The Dalles, Oregon, headed south through Dufur and Tygh Valley (which some folks consider the start of the Barlow Road), then turned west at Gate Creek and generally followed the White River before it headed north through Barlow Pass and Government Camp. It then passed through "Tollgate #5" near today's Rhododendron and continued to the community of Sandy, where it turned west and ended up at Oregon City.


Follow the Barlow Road ... (east to west)


 
Side Trip to Mount Hood

Mount Hood ...

In October 1845 as Sam Barlow and Joel Palmer were searching for a route around the south side of Mount Hood, they reached a spot as far as the wagons could go. While the majority of the group stayed behind at what was to be known as "Fort Deposit", Sam Barlow, Joel Palmer, and a man named Lock scouted ahead and attempted to climb Mount Hood as high as they could go in order to scout the territory to the west and south of the peak. They were looking for a pass which would allow wagons to travel. Joel Palmer climbed Mount Hood's slopes, turning around in the vicinity of Illumination Rock. He took note of a possible passage out of the Cascades. Unfortunately, from the slopes of Mount Hood, the steepness of Laurel Hill could not be seen. The Palmer Glacier and Snowfield on Mount Hood is named for Joel Palmer.


Image, 2012, Road to Timberline, Mount Hood, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Road to Timberline, Mount Hood, Oregon. Image taken July 6, 2012.

From Joel Palmer's Journal ...

"... After taking some refreshment, we ascended the mountain, intending to head the deep ravine, in order to ascertain whether there was any gap in the mountain south of us, which would admit of a pass. From this peak, we overlooked the whole of the mountains. We followed up the grassy ridge for one miles and a half, when it became barren. My two friends began to lag behind, and show signs of fatigue; they finally stopped, and contended that we could not get round the head of the ravine, and that it was useless to attempt an ascent. But I was of a different opinion, and wished to go on. They consented, and followed for half a mile, when they sat down, and requested me to go up to the ledge, and, if we could effect a passage up and get round it, to give them a signal. I did so, and found that by climbing up a cliff of snow and ice, for about forty feet, but not so steep but that by getting upon one cliff, and cutting holes to stand in and hold on by, it could be ascended. I gave the signal, and they came up. In the mean time, I had cut and carved my way up the cliff, and when up to the top was forced to admit that it was something of an undertaking; but as I had arrived safely at the top of the cliff, I doubted not but they could accomplish the same task, and as my moccasins were worn out, and the soles of my feet exposed to the snow, I was disposed to be traveling, and so left them to get up the best way they could. After proceeding about one mile upon the snow, continually winding up, I began to despair of seeing my companions. I came to where a few detached pieces of rock had fallen form the ledge above and rolled down upon the ice and snow, (for the whole mass is more like ice than snow;) I clambered upon one of these, and waited half an hour. I then rolled stones down the mountain for half an hour; but as I could see nothing of my two friends, I began to suspect that they had gone back, and crossed in the trail. I then went round to the south-east side, continually ascending, and taking an observation of the country south, and was fully of the opinion that we could find a passage through."


Source:    Joel Palmer, October 12, 1845, p.132-133, IN: Journal of Travels over the Rocky Mountains to the mouth of the Columbia River, made during the years 1845 and 1846, by Joel Palmer, first printed in 1847, reprinted in Thwaites, R.G., Early Western Travels, 1748-1846, published 1906.


Image, 2012, Road to Timberline, Mount Hood, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Road to Timberline, Mount Hood, Oregon. Illumination Rock is on the left horizon and the Palmer Glacier is the snowfields on the left flank with the ski lift (barely visible). Image taken July 6, 2012.
Image, 2010, Mount Hood from Timberline, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mount Hood as seen from Timberline, Oregon. Illumination Rock is on the left horizon and the Palmer Glacier is the snowfield on the left with the ski lift. Image taken July 17, 2010.
Image, 2009, Timberline Lodge, Mount Hood, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Timberline Lodge, Mount Hood, Oregon. Image taken August 16, 2009.
Image, 2009, Timberline Lodge, Mount Hood, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Timberline Lodge, Mount Hood, Oregon. Image taken August 16, 2009.
Image, 2009, Timberline Lodge, Mount Hood, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel, Timberline Lodge, Mount Hood, Oregon. Image taken July 22, 2013.
Image, 2009, Timberline Lodge, Mount Hood, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel, Timberline Lodge, Mount Hood, Oregon. Image taken September 20, 2011.
Image, 2009, Timberline Lodge, Mount Hood, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Clark's Nutcracker, Timberline Lodge, Mount Hood, Oregon. Image taken July 22, 2013.
Image, 2009, Timberline Lodge, Mount Hood, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Aster and bee, Timberline Lodge, Mount Hood, Oregon. Image taken August 16, 2009.
Image, 2009, Timberline Lodge, Mount Hood, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mariposa Lily, Timberline Lodge, Mount Hood, Oregon. Image taken August 16, 2009.
Image, 2009, Timberline Lodge, Mount Hood, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Phlox, Timberline Lodge, Mount Hood, Oregon. Image taken July 17, 2010.
Image, 2011, Mount Hood from Timberline, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mount Hood as seen from Timberline, Oregon. Illumination Rock is on the left and the Palmer Glacier is the snowfield on the left with the ski lift. Image taken September 20, 2011.
Image, 2011, Mount Hood from Timberline, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mount Hood as seen from Timberline, Oregon. Image taken September 20, 2011.



  • NEXT: Barlow Pass to Oregon Highway 35
    • Overview ...
    • Devil's Half Acre Campground to Barlow Pass ...
    • Barlow Pass ...
    • Grave Trail ...
    • Pioneer Woman's Grave ...
    • Crossing the East Fork Salmon River ...
    • East Fork Salmon River ... "Rock Wall"
    • East Fork Salmon River ... "Marking the Trail"
    • Oregon Highway 35 and Highway 26 Junction ...






HOME
NORTHWEST JOURNEY
COLUMBIA RIVER IMAGES
THE BARLOW ROAD
THE COLUMBIA RIVER HIGHWAY



*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website.

Lat/Long were obtained from plotting location on National Geographic's TOPO! program, 3.4.3, 2003.

Sources:    [See Barlow Road Sources]

TheBarlowRoad.com/barlow_road_side_trip_mount_hood.html
© 2016, Lyn Topinka, "TheBarlowRoad.com", All rights reserved.
Images are NOT to be downloaded from this website.
December 2015