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"The Barlow Road ... White River"
Includes ... Barlow Road ... White River ...
Image, 2013, Sign, Barlow Road, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Barlow Road sign, Foster Farm, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2013.


The Barlow Road ...
The Barlow Road was a part of the Oregon Trail. The road was authorized by the Oregon Legislature in 1845, and by September 1846, it made its way around the south side of Mount Hood. This 80-to-110-mile road provided an alternative to the dangerous and expensive route that used rafts to transport wagons down the Columbia River. The Barlow Road began at The Dalles, Oregon, headed south through Dufur and Tygh Valley (which some folks consider the start of the Barlow Road), then turned west at Gate Creek and generally followed the White River before it headed north through Barlow Pass and Government Camp. It then passed through "Tollgate #5" near today's Rhododendron and continued to the community of Sandy, where it turned west and ended up at Oregon City.


Follow the Barlow Road ... (east to west)


 
Following the White River

Overview ...

(to come)


White River ...

The White River drainage begins on Mount Hood's southern flanks, with its headwaters draining the White River Glacier and flowing through White River Canyon, the steep canyon between Mount Hood's Timberline Lodge and the Mount Hood Meadows ski areas. The White River flows southeast before turning east. As it reaches the Tygh Valley the river travels again in a deep canyon with steep banks on both sides. Early Barlow Road pioneers stayed north of this deep canyon as they headed around Mount Hood. The White River drainage is 50 miles long and merges with the Deschutes River east of Tygh Valley at Deschutes River Mile (RM) 46. In 1988 nearly the entire reach of the White River was designated as a "National Wild and Scenic River" by the U.S. Congress. Major tributaries of the White River which Barlow Road wagons had to cross are Threemile Creek, Rock Creek, Boulder Creek, Deep Creek, and Barlow Creek. The White River was named after it's color, at times appearing white with glacial silt.


Image, 2013, White River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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White River near Mount Hood, looking downstream from Highway 35. Flood plain after the river leaves the slopes of Mount Hood. Image taken July 8, 2013.
Image, 2013, White River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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White River at Tygh Valley, looking upstream from Highway 197 bridge. Before the river enters the lower canyon. Image taken June 5, 2013.

Wamic to USFS Road #3530 ...

From the Threemile Creek crossing in Wamic, the early Barlow Road heads southwest, crossing Rock Creek and heads towards Gate Creek where it follows the north bank of Gate Creek before crossing that creek.

The 1860 cadastral survey map for T4S, R12E, shows this Barlow Road. It is called the "Immigrant Road".

The 1872 cadastral survey map for T4S R11E however shows a different Barlow Road and it is labeled "Road across the Cascades to Barlows Gate". This road comes in from the northeast and crosses Gate Creek at "Russells House" (T4S, R11E, Sec.35). "Russells House" is the tollgate location. The track of the early Barlow Road is penciled in.

This newer Barlow Road route became the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) Road #3530, with parts of the original path occasionally being to the north or the south of Road #3530.


Image, 2012, Cadastral Survey detail, Barlow Road and Gate Creek, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Crossing Gate Creek, 1860 and 1872. Map detail, 1872 Cadastral of T4S, R12E, and 1860 Cadastral of T4S, R12E, showing the two paths of the Barlow Road crossing Gate Creek. Cadastral Survey map courtesy U.S. Bureau of Land Management's website, 2012.

Important NOTE:
ALTERNATIVE: USFS Road #48:

USFS Road #3530 is not maintained and not recommended for ordinary cars. However the paved and maintained USFS Road #48 out of Wamic follows the same general route as Road #3530 and is located approximately 1-2 miles north. While most of the original Barlow Road locations will not be seen, the feeling of the landscape can be had.

USFS Road #48 will then connect with USFS Road #43 which will cross the White River just south of the Barlow Crossing Campground. Road #43 then continues south and connects with the major Oregon Highway 26 south of Mount Hood. Follow Highway 26 north to reach Portland.


Image, 2013, Sign, USFS Road 3530, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Information sign, USFS Road #3530. Image taken June 5, 2013.
Image, 2013, Rock Creek Reservoir, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Map detail, USFS Roads #48 and USFS Road #3530. Map from information panel about the Barlow Road, Rock Creek Reservoir, Wasco County, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2013.

Rock Creek ...

Rock Creek is a tributary of the White River and merges with the White River at RM 12. Rock Creek was quite possibly named by Joel Palmer on October 4, 1845, while he was searching for a route around the south side of Mount Hood. He crossed a creek in the vicinity of today's Rock Creek.

"... October 4.   This morning myself and companion, with a scanty supply of provisions for a two days' journey, started on a westerly course into the mountains. From the open ground we could see Mount Hood. Our object was to go south and near to this peak. For five miles the country was alternately prairie and yellow pine; we then ascended a ridge, which ascended gradually to the west. This we followed for ten miles. After the crossing of a little brushy bottom, we took over another ridge for four or five miles, very heavily timbered and densely covered with undergrowth. We descended the ridge for a short distance, and traveled a level bench for four miles; this is covered with very large and tall fir timber; we then descended the mountain, traveling westward for one and a half miles; we then came to a small branch, which we named Rock creek. ..."

Source:    Joel Palmer, October 4, 1845, p.126, IN: Journal of Travels over the Rocky Mountains to the mouth of the Columbia River, made during the years 1845 and 1846, by Joel Palmer, first printed in 1847, reprinted in Thwaites, R.G., Early Western Travels, 1748-1846, published 1906.


Image, 2013, Lewis's Woodpecker, Wasco County, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Lewis's Woodpecker, on the road from Wamic to Rock Creek Reservoir, Wasco County, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2013.


The Lewis's Woodpecker is a woodpecker of the open woodlands of the western plains and is often found in groves of oak trees. It was first seen and described in 1806 by Meriwether Lewis of the Lewis and Clark expedition, and subsequently named after him.

Rock Creek Crossing ... (original route/Smock Road/USFS Road #3530)

From Wamic the Barlow Road route goes nearly ten miles before crossing Rock Creek.

To reach the early 1860 cadastral survey Rock Creek crossing, head south from Wamic on Wamic Market Road, travelling approximatley 3/4 mile to Smock Road. Turn south (left) and follow the zigzagging Smock Road down to the crossing at Rock Creek. This crossing lies approximately 1/4 mile downstream of where the 1860 cadastral survey "Immigrant Road" crosses Rock Creek.

To reach the later 1872 cadastral survey Rock Creek crossing (assumed from back-tracking 1872 route to the next T/R, map not available), head south from Wamic on Wamic Market Road to Smock Road but proceed straight (west) on Woodcock Road. Today's maps show Woodcock Road ending at or near Rock Creek, with unmaintained roads crossing Rock Creek and continuing to USFS Road #3530.

(T4S, R12E, Sec.28)


Image, 2012, Cadastral Survey detail, Barlow Road crossing Rock Creek, click to enlarge
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Crossing Rock Creek and reaching Gate Creek, 1860. Map detail, 1860 Cadastral Survey of T4S R12E, SE quarter, showing the "Immigrant Road" crossing Rock Creek and reaching Gate Creek before turning west to head to the location of the original Tollgate. Cadastral Survey map courtesy U.S. Bureau of Land Management's website, 2012.

ALTERNATIVE:
USFS Road #48, Rock Creek Reservoir:

Today the traveler can follow a similar path as the original Barlow Road path while staying on newer and improved roads. Take USFS Route #48 out of Wamic to Rock Creek Reservoir.

Follow Rock Creek Dam Road west out of Wamic for approximately six miles. At Rock Creek Reservoir USFS Road #48 turns south and crosses Rock Creek. Continuing south Road #48 crosses Gate Creek approximately one mile upstream of the old Barlow Tollgate. From there, Road #48 turns west and parallels the old Barlow Road (Road #3530) but stays one to two miles north of it. Proceed for approximately 12.5 miles to USFS Road #43. Turn left and within a quarter of a mile Road #43 crosses the White River just south of the Barlow Creek Crossing Campground.

Excerpt from the Barlow Road National Register of Historic Places Nomination Report, 1992:
"... The Barlow Road enters the [Mount Hood National Forest] in T4S, R11E, Sec.25, W.M. Between the Forest boundary on the east and Gate Creek, the road has been little altered since established. The route is a largely ungraded, ungraveled, clay wagon road which has left a trace or set of ruts across the hardpan where grow mixed groves of ponderosa pine and oak. Accessible to vehicles in a few places, this segment crosses a rocky prairie. ...   At points the road ruts are not readily distinguishable because of the hard ground and the lack of a need of the road boulders to stack stones to the margin of the right-of-way. ..."

Image, 2013, Rock Creek Reservoir, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Rock Creek Reservoir, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2013.
Image, 2013, Rock Creek Reservoir, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Rock Creek Reservoir, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2013.
Image, 2013, Rock Creek Reservoir, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Rock Creek Reservoir, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2013.
Image, 2013, Rock Creek Reservoir, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Rock Creek Reservoir, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2013.
Image, 2013, Rock Creek Reservoir, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Barlow Road information panels, Rock Creek Reservoir, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2013.

Smock Prairie ...

Smock Prairie lies along the early pioneer road, seven miles southwest of Wamic. Oregon Geographic Names (McArthur and McArthur, 2003) states:

"Smock Prairie is southwest of Wamic. McNeal, in History of Wasco County, p.247, says Smock was named for the Smock family and was a much older community than nearby Wamic. Smock post office was established October 28, 1899 ... [and] closed May 31, 1909."

Image, 2013, Smock Prairie School, Wamic, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Smock Prairie School, Wamic, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2013.

The one-room Smock Prairie School (No.44) was built in 1906 and originally was located in T4S, R12E, Section 32. It served as a school from 1906 to 1956 for the community of Smock Prairie. The community was settled in 1885 on the early Barlow Road and was named for the Smock family. The post office was established in 1899 and closed in 1909. In 1995 the schoolhouse was moved to the outskirts of Wamic and is presently used as a museum.

Gate Creek ...

Gate Creek is a tributary of Rock Creek and enters Rock Creek not quite three miles upstream of Rock Creek merging into the White River.

Excerpt from the Barlow Road National Register of Historic Places Nomination Report, 1992:
"... At Gate Creek the road descends from the oak-covered plateau down a well-defined trace. The road cuts along the margin of a basalt flow from which have tumbled numerous boulders. The road builders pried and rolled these to the side and they provide a well-demarcated identification of the route. Two sets of parallel ruts descend the hillside east of Gate Creek. At the base of the hill are the berms which once served as the footings of a low-water bridge spanning Gate Creek. ..."

Gate Creek Crossing ... (original route/Smock Road)

The early Barlow Road route crosses Gate Creek a little over 5 miles upstream from where Gate Creek merges into Rock Creek. Between 1846 to 1852 the first of five tollgates operating on the Barlow Road was established at this Gate Creek crossing.

The route on the 1860 cadastral survey for T4S, R12E, shows the "Immigrant Road" crossing Rock Creek and heading southwest to Gate Creek, where it then turns west following Gate Creek's north bank until it crosses in T4S, R11E, Section 35. The route shown on the 1872 cadastral survey map shows "Road Across the Cascades to Barlow's Gate" crossing at the same location, but entering the area from the northeast. The road coming in from the east and shown on the 1860 cadastral is penciled in.

The 1930 "Dufur" 1:125,000 topographic map shows the main road crossing Gate Creek in T4S, R12E, Section 33, east of the old tollgate and crossing location. After passing through Smock Prairie, this road eventually connects with the "Old Barlow Road". This road today is Smock Road.

Smock Road crosses Gate Creek approximately 3.5 miles downstream of the original crossing. To reach this crossing of Gate Creek, head south from Wamic on Wamic Market Road and travel approximately 3/4 mile to Smock Road. Turn left and follow the zigzagging Smock Road down to the crossing at Rock Creek. Continue approximately 1.3 miles further until you reach Gate Creek. Maps show Smock Road continuing south, then west, and then north, reaching an unmaintained road which connects with USFS Road #3530. This web author has no idea of the condition of these roads.


Image, 2013, 1930 topographic map showing main route from Wamic, click to enlarge
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Topographic map detail, 1930, Gate Creek Crossing. Topographic map detail, 1930 "Dufur" 1:125,000 map, showing main routes from Wamic heading towards the "Old Barlow Road" and the crossing of Gate Creek.

Gate Creek Crossing ... First Tollgate (1846 to 1852)

The original 1860 cadastral survey road to the first Tollgate location does not exist today. However the Tollgate location can be reached via Forest Service roads. A high-clearance vehicle is necessary.

One way to get there is from USFS Road #48. From Rock Creek Reservoir, head south on Road #48. Proceed 3 miles and turn left on USFS Road #170 (signage from Road #48 says "Old Barlow Road, 1 mile"). Within 0.3 miles turn left (east) on Road #171 (signage was there in 2013 but damaged with only the old name "4800" visible). Follow Road #171 for about 1 mile until it hits Road #3530 (the Barlow Road) at the edge of a large meadow. Then, according to "Mountain Biking Oregon" (written in 1998, we didn't make it this far in 2013 and turned around before reaching Road #3530 when the road just got too rutted) turn left (east) on the dirt road and proceed for 0.1 mile to a green gate. Park off the road near the green gate. The site of the Barlow Road's eastern tollgate is 0.5 mile past the green gate, in a meadow near a large cottonwood. The 120 acres surrounding the tollgate site is part of the White River State Game Management Area.

(T4S R11E, Sec.35)

Excerpt from the Barlow Road National Register of Historic Places Nomination Report, 1992:
"... On the western margin of the bottomland at Gate Creek is the probable location of the original toll station on the Barlow Road. A fairly extensive scatter of historic era debris identifies the site. ... The objects include enamelware cooking pans, a galvanized washtub, broken bottles, porcelain dinnerware, and stove parts. Two rock-lined depressions on the eastern face of the sidehill suggest that coolers or storage cellars were once located at this site. The bottomland at Gate Creek, site of the first toll station and subsequent residences, is owned by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. This section of the Barlow Road is fenced and closed to vehicle access approximately one-quarter mile both east and west of Gate Creek. ... ..."

Excerpt from the Barlow Road National Register of Historic Places Nomination Report, 1992:
"... The western edge of the bottomland is the probable site of the toll station used by the road owners from 1846 to 1852. This site was variously known historically as Barlow's Gate or the Gate Creek Toll Station. Long identified as the "Strickland Place" in the twentieth century, this site was occupied in 1872 when the cadastral surveyors laid out the subdivisions of the township. They identified the site as "Russell's House". The trace of an irrigation ditch passes from north to south and bisects the edge of the terrace where buildings once stood. To the southwest of the caved-in cellars lie the remains of a split-rail fence which followed the right-hand side of the Barlow Road as it ascended from the bottomland. In 1947 John Beard camped at this location during a horseback trip over the Barlow Road. His photograph showed the terrace on the west side of the bottomland wherein stood a barn with vertical board and batten siding and a nearby one story building, probably of log construction. None of these structures remains in 1989, though nails and decaying wood suggest they once stood at this site. ..."

Image, 2012, Cadastral Survey detail, Barlow Road crossing Gate Creek, click to enlarge
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Map detail, 1872, Tollgate #1. Map detail, 1872 Cadastral Survey of T4S R11E, Sec.35, showing the Barlow Road crossing Gate Creek. "Russells House" is the location of the first Tollgate. The early 1860 cadastral survey "Immigrants Road" is penciled in on this 1872 map, entering Section 36 from the east. The "Road Across the Cascades to Barlows Gate" road of the 1872 cadastral survey enters from the northeast. This 1872 road would become USFS Road #3530, also known as the "Barlow Road". Cadastral Survey map courtesy U.S. Bureau of Land Management's website, 2012.
Image, 2013, Turn for Gate Creek, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Turn for USFS Road #3530, the "Old Barlow Road", from USFS Road #48. Image taken June 5, 2013.
Image, 2013, USFS Road 171 sign, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Sign for USFS Road 171, turning off of USFS Road #170, on way to USFS Road #3530, the "Old Barlow Road". Image taken June 5, 2013.

ALTERNATIVE:
USFS Road #48, Gate Creek Crossing:

USFS Road #48 crosses Gate Creek approximately 3/4 mile northwest of the location on Gate Creek where Sam Barlow established his tollgate.


Image, 2013, Gate Creek, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Fenced off Gate Creek at USFS Road #48. View looking east. Image taken June 5, 2013.
Image, 2013, Gate Creek, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Gate Creek looking upstream, at USFS Road #48. Image taken June 5, 2013.
Image, 2013, Gate Creek, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Gate Creek looking downstream at USFS Road #48. Image taken June 5, 2013.

Gate Creek heading West ... (original route/USFS Road #3530)

After leaving Gate Creek, the Barlow Road route again stays on the north side of the White River, going nearly 12 miles before crossing the White River below its junction with Barlow Creek. Today's USFS Road #3530 generally follows the old Barlow Road, with occasional sections of the trace appearing to the north or the south of the Forest Service Road. Points of interest along this road include Immigrant Spring, Boulder Ditch, and Deep Creek.

Excerpt from the Barlow Road National Register of Historic Places Nomination Report, 1992:
"... West of Gate Creek the Barlow Road runs along the northern margin of a prairie. At the west end of the prairie, the road enters the forested eastern slope of the Cascade foothills. This segment of the road is sometimes used by four-wheel drive vehicles. It is not maintained. Dead oak trees have fallen across it and have discouraged vehicle use. At the western edge of the prairie is a cattle guard and at that point the Barlow Road is identical with Forest Road No.3530. From this site to the west bank of the White River, a distance of nearly 10 miles, the Forest Service has established for the past decade a program of non-maintenance. It has not graded, graveled, cleared, or taken any action to sustain vehicle use of the route. The result is that the road is badly rutted, filled in places with stray rocks, and is encroached upon by the forest understory. This management has significantly restored the historic landscape of probably original conditions of the road grade. Fewer and fewer vehicles travel over this segment of the road each year because of its condition. ..."

Immigrant Spring ... (original route/USFS Road #3530)

(T4S, R11E, Sec.31, elevation 3,281 feet)
(45.10.34N, 121.28.50W)

Excerpt from the Barlow Road National Register of Historic Places Nomination Report, 1992:
"... Identified variously as Emigrant Springs or Immigrant Springs, this site is a lonely trickly of water oozing into a muddy puddle about 100 feet north of the Barlow Road. The setting is densely forested with a mix of firs and maples. ...  

Emigrant Springs was probably used by emigrant travelers on the Barlow Road. Some may have camped at this site, though its location was sufficiently close to Gate Creek that emigrants normally would have had little reason to remain at the spring. Its lack of any feed for livestock and the determination of most travelers to try to reach White River Station in one day of travel were further factors mitigating its use. ..."


Boulder Ditch and Boulder Creek Crossing ... (original route/USFS Road #3530)

(T4S, R10E, Sec.35, elevation 3,133 feet)
(45.10.27N, 121.30.40W)

Excerpt from the Barlow Road National Register of Historic Places Nomination Report, 1992:
"... Although most of the Barlow Road in this segment is identical to Forest Road 3530, sections of the early trace appear to the north or south of the present route in a number of locations. Approximately 60 feet west of the crossing of Boulder Ditch, for example, an old segment descends the hillside. This trace has been badly disturbed in past years by logging, yet the ruts are visible as they lead to Boulder Creek. West of this creek the old trace leads directly up the hillside, while Road 3530 uses switchbacks for its ascent. Boulder Ditch, an irrigation feature running through the Forest, was constructed prior to 1930. The ditch passes under the Barlow Road in a culvert and contains a crystal-clear flow of water in an excavatgion about six feet wide and three feet deep. ..."

Deep Creek Crossing ... (original route/USFS Road #3530)

(T4S, R10E, Sec.33)

Excerpt from the Barlow Road National Register of Historic Places Nomination Report, 1992:
"... At Deep Creek a well defined segment of the old road trace descends on the east side of the ravine. Some have referred to this site as "Little Laurel Hill". ...  An old road trace ascends the slope west of the creek and joins Road 3530 about 300 feet beyond the crossing. ...  West of [Deep Creek] the Barlow Road begins a long descent to the west into the watershed of White River. The road passes Charity and Faith springs and drops several hundred feet in elevation in a steady but not precipitous route. At points short segments of old road traces are visible to the south or below Road 3530. As with other parts of the route between Gate Creek and the crossing of White River, this portion of the Barlow Road is not graded, cleared, or maintained. ..."

White River Crossing ... (original route/USFS Road #3530)

The 1882 cadastral survey map shows the Barlow Road crossing the White River in T4S, R10E, Section 30, while today's USFS Road #3530 crosses further south in T4S, R10E, Section 31, at White River Mile 33.5. Historians however believe the early Barlow Road crossing of the White River is uncertain and actually may have varied at this flat stretch of the river. At this point the White River broadens out into a valley, providing emigrant wagons many opportunities to cross the river.

(T4S, R10E, Sec.31, Sec.32, elevation 2,850 feet)
(45.11.08N, 121.35.10W)

Excerpt from the Barlow Road National Register of Historic Places Nomination Report, 1992:
"... Forest Road 3530 is maintained west of the crossing of White River in T4S, R10E, Sec.32, W.M.   The exact route of the old road trace is uncertain west of the base of the descent of the hill east of White River. Emigrants probably took advantage of the generally open, gravel banks of White River and guided their wagons up the course of this meandering stream. Travel diaries mention crossing the river several times. Approximately a mile west of the base of the hill, the old road trace is clearly synonymous with Road 3530 and passes along the west side of White River Forest Camp. ..."

Image, 2012, Cadastral Survey detail, Barlow Road crossing the White River, click to enlarge
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Crossing the White River, 1882. Map detail, 1882 Cadastral Survey of T4S R10E, showing the "Barlow Wagon Road' crossing the White River in Section 30. Today's U.S. Forest Service Road #3530, which generally follows the early Barlow Road, crosses the White River in the northeast corner of Section 31. Cadastral Survey map courtesy U.S. Bureau of Land Management's website, 2012.

ALTERNATIVE:
USFS Road #48 and #43, White River Crossing:

From Wamic, go about 20 miles west on Forest Road #48, turn left (south) and go another half mile on Road #43. Road #43 crosses the White River just downstream of where Barlow Creek enters the White, and upstream of where Barlow Road wagons crossed the White. After crossing the White, turn right (north) onto USFS Road #3530 (the Barlow Road).


White River Station Campground ... (original route/USFS Road #3530)

The White River Station Campground is located at White River RM 35.

(T4S, R10E, Sec.30, elevation 2,094 feet)
(45.11.53N, 121.35.58W)

Excerpt from the Barlow Road National Register of Historic Places Nomination Report, 1992:
"... This popular recreation site on the west bank of White River was a primary first day destination for pioneers. Most attempted to push westward from Gate Creek to this site since it was relatively open, afforded water for livestock, and provided a respite from the dark, forest conditions through which they had traveled. The site is a well-drained terrace on the margin of a forest. To the west lies a swamp. A CCC sign erected in the 1930s at this site reads: "Old White River Station, a camp site used in pioneer days." ...

As early as 1882, Cornelius Gray operated a store at White River Station. In 1883 Perry Vickers, who resided at Summit Meadows, was murdered at this site in a shoot-out with robbers fleeing Clackamas County. ...

In 1989 the site of old White River Station lies between the Barlow Road and White River. The road ruts, identical with Forest Road 3530, run in a nearly north-south direction through the forest to the west. Modestly improved campsites with fire rings lie on the bank of the river. White River has cut into the terrace where White River Station once stood. In 1989 it is impossible to identify the location of Gray's store or to find any artifacts suggesting past activity at this site. ..."




  • NEXT: Following Barlow Creek
    • USFS Road #3530 ...
    • Barlow Creek ...
    • Barlow Creek Crossing ...
    • Barlow Crossing Campground and Barlow Creek Campground ...
    • ALTERNATIVE: USFS Road #48 and #43, Barlow Crossing Campground ...
    • Klinger's Camp ...
    • Grindstone Campground ...
    • Following USFS Road #3530 ...
    • Fort Deposit ...
    • Devil's Half Acre Campground ...






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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website.

Lat/Long were obtained from plotting location on National Geographic's TOPO! program, 3.4.3, 2003.

Sources:    [See Barlow Road Sources]

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Images are NOT to be downloaded from this website.
October 2013